Homebrew Competition categories:

Note – Standard & Strong bitters/Pales have been split into two categories. If like last year we get just the odd entry for a ‘standard’ and lots in the ‘strong’ for either, they will be combined into one.

Lagers are to be entered into specialty, but again if we have enough to create its own to be judged we will do so.

Porters & Stouts

  • Stout styles in this class include: Oyster Stout (with or without oysters), Irish Dry, Milk/Cream (sweet), Oatmeal and English.
  • Porters in this class include both brown and black (robust)
  • Must be within 4.5% – 7% ABV range
  • A beer below 4.5% ABV may be entered in this category if it conforms to the style of a Stout or Porter, with a sufficiently assertive hop-accented palate to be unsuitable for the Standard Mild Ales category
  • Must not contain any “speciality” ingredient at a level as defined in the Speciality Beers category

Old Ales,  Milds &  Brown Ales

  • Embraces a range of styles of dark beer for the Standard Mild and Brown
  • Must be no stronger than 7% ABV
  • Must not contain any “speciality” ingredient at a level as defined in the Speciality Beers category

Standard Bitters

  • Includes bitters that are Upto 4.5% ABV
  • Embraces a range of colours as for Standard Bitters
  • These beers can have medium levels of bitterness and a range of hop characteristics but the overall impression must be that of a balance of flavours without harshness.
  • Must not contain any “speciality” ingredient at a level as defined in the Speciality Beers category
  • Also covers black bitters

Standard Pales

  • Includes pale ales that are Upto 4.5% ABV
  • Embraces a range of colours for Pale Ales.
  • These beers can have medium to high levels of bitterness and a range of hop characteristics but the overall impression must be that of a balance of flavours without harshness.
  • Must not contain any “speciality” ingredient at a level as defined in the Speciality Beers category

Strong Pale Ales

  • Includes pale ales that are 4.5% – 7% ABV
  • Embraces a range of colours as for Pale Ales.
  • These beers can have medium to high levels of bitterness and a range of hop characteristics but the overall impression must be that of a balance of flavours without harshness.
  • Must not contain any “speciality” ingredient at a level as defined in the Speciality Beers category
  • Also covers black bitters

Strong Bitters

  • Includes pale ales that are 4.5% – 7% ABV
  • Embraces a range of colours for Bitters
  • These beers can have medium levels of bitterness and a range of hop characteristics but the overall impression must be that of a balance of flavours without harshness.
  • Must not contain any “speciality” ingredient at a level as defined in the Speciality Beers category
  • Also covers black bitters

Speciality Beers

LAGERS are to be entered into this category. If we receive enough these will be judged on their own together.

Embraces all styles of beer that contain a non-core brewing ingredient at a level intended to impart a distinctive and discernible flavour note or character. Ingredients may include: Spice / Herb / Honey / Coffee / Chocolate / Gluten Free* / Fruit / Vegetable / Wood Aged / Smoked (>20%) / Rye (Malted or raw >20%) / Nuts / Wheat (>20% malted or raw & made with wheat beer yeast) and others as per the  imagination of the Brewer.

N.B. ANY ALLERGENS, INCLUDING CEREALS CONTAINING GLUTEN, MUST BE DECLARED AT TIME OF ENTRY

  • Category excludes: American style black ales, multigrain and organic beers which should be entered in the appropriate Bitter & Pale Ale category for ABV content.
  • The use of a non-typical yeast is not warranted as being enough for entry into this category.
  • *Gluten Free beers can be entered in the speciality category if they are produced from gluten free cereals/grains such as sorghum, rice and millet. If an external enzyme (i.e. Brewer’s Clarex) or deglutinated barley is the main malt used then the beer should be entered into the relevant non speciality category; if de-glutinated wheat is the significant malt used, then they may be entered in the speciality category as a wheat beer.
  • Core brewing ingredients include barley malt and malt extract, hops and hop oils, caramel, brewing sugars, brewer’s yeast, water and brewing salts, and fining agents
  • Non-barley-malt grain adjuncts can count as a core ingredient, at the discretion of the brewer, if used at low levels (typically no more than 10% of the grist)
  • A beer containing a non-core ingredient as defined above must be entered in this category and may not be entered in any other category.
  • Entry forms will include space for a note explaining the speciality qualification of the beer, which can then be communicated to the judges.